conflict minerals countries

What are conflict minerals?

The SEC rules define conflict minerals as 3TG metals, wherever extracted. For example, tin extracted in Canada, Russia or Argentina is considered a conflict mineral by definition. In the SEC rule, “DRC conflict-free” is defined as minerals that were extracted and did not directly or indirectly benefit armed groups in the covered countries.

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Conflict Mineral Definition EcoVadis

2021-5-5 · Conflict minerals mined in the DRC may pass through numerous locations in neighboring countries as they are shipped to processing facilities. These countries are: Sudan, Central Africa Republic, Uganda, Congo Republic, Angola, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zambia

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Conflict Minerals Responsible Minerals Global

The global minerals trade has funded abuses and armed conflict for decades. Minerals that have bankrolled social and environmental harms still end up in our mobile phones, laptops and cars. Businesses must act responsibly by checking their supply chains.

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Conflict Minerals United States Department of State

2021-1-20 · The PPA is a multi-sector and multi-stakeholder initiative that supports supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa.

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Conflict Minerals Regulation explained Trade

2020-12-21 · The EU regulation covers tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold because these are the four minerals that are most often linked to armed-conflicts and related human rights abuses, so it makes sense to focus on them. The regulation also draws on well

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Conflict Minerals –The Reasonable Country of Origin

2012-8-27 · After a company has determined that it is subject to Rule 13p-1 and that it manufactures products for which conflict minerals are necessary, it must conduct a reasonable country of origin inquiry in order to determine whether the conflict minerals in its products originated in a “covered country” the DRC or one of its adjoining countries, such as Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, the Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

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An Initial Look at Conflict Minerals; Dodd Frank

2014-6-23 · For the purposes of the rule, conflict minerals include tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten. Covered countries are defined in Section 1502 as having an internationally recognized border with DRC and include Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

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EU Conflict Minerals vs. US Conflict Minerals A

2021-4-29 · Inconspicuously buried at the end of the 800+ pages bill, section 1502 on conflict minerals addresses the need to increase transparency in corporate supply chains in an effort to reduce the number of conflict mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjoining countries, where the sale of highly coveted minerals contributes to funding armed factions and fuel wars, unintentionally

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MOOG INC. Conflict Minerals Report

2020-6-29 · to the functionality or production of these products and whether the conflict minerals originated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Zambia and Angola (the “covered countries”). These products, which may include conflict minerals,

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Conflict Minerals Disclosure SEC.gov

Determining Whether Conflict Minerals Originated in the Covered Countries: Under the final rule, a company that uses a conflict mineral is required to conduct a reasonable country of origin inquiry that must be performed in good faith and be reasonably designed to determine whether the conflict mineral originated in the Covered Countries or are

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Green Conflict Minerals International Institute for

2019-11-12 · In countries struggling with political instability, where governance for the mining sector is weak, the extraction of these minerals can be linked to violence, conflict and human rights abuses. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for example, supplies more than 63 per cent of the world’s cobalt.

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Conflict Minerals FAQ’s Boeing Suppliers

2017-5-9 · The conflict minerals and covered countries in the Rule align with those identified by the US State Department (available on the State Department website). If the State Department modifies its list of conflict minerals or covered countries, the SEC Rule automatically follows suit.

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Minerals in Conflict Global Policy Forum

2021-1-30 · Countries rich in minerals such as cobalt, coltan, cassiterite, copper, and gold are often marred by corruption, authoritarian repression, militarization, and civil war. Rebel groups, governments and mining companies exploit mineral resources, fueling civil and interstate conflict as players vie for control over riches.

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Conflict Minerals Compliance American Metal Group

2021-3-29 · Generally, Conflict Minerals collectively refers to cassiterite, columbite-tantalite, gold, wolframite, or their derivatives, including tantalum, tin and tungsten, which originate from the Democratic Republic of the Congo or specified adjoining countries (referred to herein as “Covered Countries”).

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Conflict Minerals –The Reasonable Country of Origin

2012-8-27 · To satisfy the reasonable country of origin inquiry requirement, an issuer must conduct an inquiry regarding the origin of its conflict minerals that is reasonably designed to determine whether any of its conflict minerals originated in the covered countries or are from recycled or scrap sources, and must perform the inquiry in good faith.

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EU Conflict Minerals vs. US Conflict Minerals A

2021-4-29 · In January 2021, the EU Conflict Minerals Regulation will become law across all 27 member states. Now is a good opportunity to discuss the extent to which US Conflict Minerals law has positively impacted 3TG sourcing and traceability strategies and compare the merits of both legislations.

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An Initial Look at Conflict Minerals; Dodd Frank

2014-6-23 · For the purposes of the rule, conflict minerals include tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten. Covered countries are defined in Section 1502 as having an internationally recognized border with DRC and include Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

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MOOG INC. Conflict Minerals Report

2020-6-29 · Moog has a complex supply chain that does not source conflict minerals directly from mines, smelters or refiners. In turn, Moog relies on supplier information regarding sourcing of materials, and works with these suppliers to identify, where possible, the smelters and/or refiners and countries of origin for conflict minerals.

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OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply

2021-4-28 · The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises are government-backed recommendations on responsible business conduct to encourage sustainable development and enduring social progress.,The Guidance provides recommendations for responsible mineral supply chains to help companies to respect human rights and avoid contributing to conflict through their mineral or metal

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